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that day. >> we must get in this revolution, and complete the revolution. for in the delta of mississippi, in southwest georgia, the black belt of alabama, in harlem, in chicago, detroit, philadelphia, and all over this nation, the black masses are on the march for jobs and freedom. >> in the five decades since, john lewis has become an icon of the civil rights movement, a hero who faced down brutal southern police in the name of freedom and was beaten bloody for daring to do so. today, he is a 14-term congressman from georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis. and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
in mississippi to senator john stennis. in the presidential party were bob haldeman and john ehrlichman. >> we were on air force one. we were going off to dedicate a john stennis memorial rocket launcher or something in mississippi. and i'm standing on the flight deck, and it occurred to me for about 30 seconds that i could crash this airplane and that would put an end to everybody's problems. mine, nixon's and haldeman's, everybody who was aboard. i stepped off that airplane, and usually the drill is richard nixon steps off the airplane and all the cameras click away and all that. he got off and nobody paid any attention to him. i got off and boy, they were all taking morgue shots. >> in the very last conversation i had with him there, we were talking about this break-in, in california. the elsberg psychiatrist break-in. and he said, i didn't know about that, did i? and i had to indicate to him that he did know about it. >> that, of course, is a totally out of our -- have you ever heard of this? >> yes, sir. >> i never heard of it, john. i should have been told about that, shouldn't i? >> i'm
. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every person to cast a ballot. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom must be tended to in order -- for us to grow. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable mit
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
on the south. i said, if we do not see meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your a member? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to murmurs of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equitable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we th
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
oxford, mississippi, they had the violence down there to keep black students out. george wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. king was a march for jobs and freedom but that didn't produce the civil rights accident. what produced it, john, was the death of john f. kennedy a couple months later when he was assassinated and linden johnson's presidency and building on that movement to pass the civil rights act, and then selma produced the voting rights act. but let me say this john. there was a downside in that decade, too. snick was no longer led by john lewis but h rap brown and stokley carmichael. you had the riots in watts in '65. dr. king was shot, a hundred cities burned, including washington, d.c. i was in nixon's campaign. the whole issue was law and order in america, and at one point nixon and wallace together had almost 70% of the national vote. >> eleanor. >> well, that was quite a trip through history, thank you. but nixon and wallace together culminate in the southern strategy where you take political exploitation of the plight, if you will, of blacks in the south, and when
, mississippi and several other places. >> julian, do you remember? >> several people supporting the march were asked to donate staff to the march and i was donated to the march on washington committee. got john's speech, the original speech -- that went to members of the press who were seated down below lincoln. i passed out the copies of john's speech. i pointed out to them that john would be the only speaker speaking that day to talk about black people instead of negroes or colored people. i thought and we thought this demonstration showed how different we were and superior we were to the other civil rights organizations. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? vix i meant aggressive. i did not mean anything harmful. i have always been upset by people who say "oh, you are so militant." it is not equate abu with violence. it just means someone aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. i thought we were more militant than the other groups gathered there. >> what was the magic of dr. king? martin luther king jr., more than any other leader of our times, had the capacity and the to define, but
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
angel alumni groups exist from schools including harvard, march kwet and the university of mississippi. schools with a strong sense of spirit and entrepreneurial, computer, math and science programs. bayler university is one of them. >> we are one of four kpos selected to actually present at their angel breakfast. after the presentation we had six weeks of due diligence where they had to go through and interview us and try to poke holes in the business and makd sure we will a viable investment. >> allowing small and medium size businesses to set up e-commerce sites in a few minutes. preferred stock giving grubs money for marketing new hires. he says it should get the firm to its goal of revenue in the low 7 figures in 2014. that's a score for students, alumni as well as the school, bill. >> that's a great idea. get those alumni in there and use their expertise and funds. >> you mentor them and fund them as well. >> thanks very much. stocks made it two for two but just barely. what happens tomorrow? >> stock pros will give you a leg up on friday's stock market action, bill, when we come
today? -- is a catfish legend in mississippi. >> we can do 400,000. >> 400,000 in one day. >> yes. >> a lot of fish. >> a lot of fish. >> reporter: one of the biggest catfish processors in the country. one of the driving forces for getting the u.s. department of agriculture to get it here. critics call that a huge waste of millions of your tax dollars because there is one big problem. you have fda inspecting? >> that's not correct. we have fda all right, a nonexistent inspection. >> reporter: believe it or not, two federal agencies are supposed to inspect the same fish. the usda spent $20 million for planning the inspections. while there have been concerns about the adequacy of inspections of imported fish in the past, do we really need usda inspection too? >> there are food safety concerns. >> catfish is a cat fish is a catfish. a safe food. >> reporter: one of the foremost food safety experts, former fda and usda official who says catfish is not a high risk food and fda should continue to be in charge of inspecting it. >> certainly isn't public health. the only thing you are lef
joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's just doing it for fun and socialization. here to talk about some of the challenges right now are cenk uygur, host of "the young turks" joining us from los angeles and from d.c., bill press, host of the "bill press show." two of the best minds in the business, my friends. i'm honored you can join us tonight. cenk, let me dive in with you first. there has been a lot of speculation about mrs. clinton's potential campaign. w
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
that will swim up, they have been known to swim up to mississippi river. most say it is the mouth of the bay. one thing you don't need to be concerned is getting attacked by a shark in chesapeake bay. there are parts of the world, chesapeake bay, they are uncommon there >> reporter: you don't need to worry about going in the bay? >> with the frequency, number of bull sharks going on, very infrequent, not going to be a problem. >> reporter: were you surprised? >> it happened in 2001. couple of fisherman, caught them, turned up at the mouth of the potomac. typically a couple every year. this is something going on. chesapeake bay is a highway of fish coming in from the ocean. they are there for food just like these sharks are coming for food. they are full of stipe bass. >> reporter: they are not hunting people? >> they are looking for fish. >> reporter: if you see one, what should you do? >> if you are at the beach and see a large shark, it would be in your best interest to go to the pool. >> reporter: i am with you. [laughter]. >> we have 16 species of sharks in the lower bay. bay is important for
problems. this hatch -- this happened on sunday engulf port, mississippi. storm hit during a church service. the rain fell so much worshippers became stranded in the church. 6 inches of rain falling in two hours there. the bishop says the property has drainage problems. only time the flooding was worse was during hurricane katrina. whoa. my. likely to be more flooding there today. there will also be heavy rain across the southeast into the mid-atlantic states. clear in the northeast across the midwest and plains. showers in the southwest and rockies. >> 97 degrees in denver. colorado springs. warming up in new york. haven't seen 86 here in weeks. 76, seattle. 90 minneapolis. miami. 109 degrees of dry, pizza oven heat in phoenix. >> the pet population at the white house is increasing by one. the first family has welcomed a second dog. her name is sunny, a portuguese water dog. >> same breed as bo, the obama's first dog. the white house says -- the breed works well for the obamas because of family allergies. sunny is entirely black, bo has a couple white spots down the middle and on paws. as
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
and great grandfather were lawyers in mississippi and drafted wills for people they said they shouldn't draft wills for, shouldn't go in those african-american houses and draft wills for them. it helped me understand, my skin may ab different color but we're all part of the human race. we've got to do better. my god, i've been so touched by everything this weekend it's indescribable. >> you absolutely set the table for us here. i appreciate how generous you've been with your intergenerational study, that we're always standing here with our parents and our children. and that you have lost your child is unspeakable. that you are here together and you are continuing to parent him, despite his loss, is extraordinary. i appreciate you continue thoug >> right. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> thank you, very, very kch. >> thank you all for being here and for sharing every part of your story. >>> up next, my father shares his memory of the march on washington with me and the moment he will never forget. we'll be right back. for a strong bag that grips the can... get glad forceflex. s
and how deep the movement is. it doesn't matter if it's in virginia, in mississippi, illinois, california, across this country, people are demanding comprehensive immigration reform and the end of the deportations and the destruction of our families. someone in the activity yesterday. i was in minneapolis st. paul. the church was full. it was full. but she bemoaned the fact that more people didn't come. she said they department come. some were tired, frustrated, and disillusioned. guess what? virginia is giving the example today. no one has the right to be tired or disillusioned. no one has the right to give up on this fight. today 1,200 people will be deported. children will be left without a mom or a dad, husband or a wife. the fear that permeates our community and the underclass exploited every day has to come to an end. you do not have the right to be tired. you have a responsibility to fight to make this a greater nation for all of us to live and va rah today is giving that example. thank you so much. [ speaking spanish ] we're going to win immigration reform because we have leaders
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
mississippi for five minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i appreciate your interest in my airports but what i want to do is make sure we keep it in the right language. my only -- sensitive personal. it is i do with time and attend a wedding like that in the private sector. it's sensitive security information. and that kind of information, we all agree, is something that is far more serious than someone not showing up for work. now, as important for me in this conversation is whether or not, mr. halinski, you saw the fact that in the contracting with tsa with private contractors, because you do not have the ability to deal with personnel found guilty of that. have you now change the contracting document to tsa to get you to where you need to be? >> yes, sir. we have changed the contract for all the contracts were spp airports, and there is a clause in there that requires them to report any type of misconduct activities of the workforce. and we also require in this new language that if an employee is identified with misconduct, that appropriate action needs to be taken by that company, sir stev
:00 eastern time, 6:00 local time. robert is joining us, oxford, mississippi, independent line. turning back to the situation in egypt, 421 dead. your thoughts. caller: i want to throw in after hearing dave from texas, but i lived in cairo this past fall as a student. i wanted to say that the completelyere are spotless in comparison to the politics here. in regards to deception of the public, deception of the western media. a few minutesller ago, i have to agree with him, the muslim brotherhood is definitely trying to turn the western eye against the military. from what i can see when i was there, the reason -- there are a lot of deaths now, the muslim brotherhood are using force and are dying because of it because the military are defending themselves, but their were much fewer deaths earlier last fall because there protesters wanted democracy and there were peaceful process. the muslim brotherhood was using force. it looks bad for the military. that is my opinion. host: two were for the call. "usa today: egypt iraq than chaos. "washington times," one us in our generals to cairo? bestca's t
collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the senate passed a bipartisan
to the summer of 1955 to the killing of emma ll. a 14-year-old african-american boy, and went to mississippi to be with an spawn uncle and cousin and is lynched. dragged out of the bed in the middle of the night by a white bomb and -- mob and ends up in the body of the river. when emma's body was found, -- emmett was 14, she was 14 when she dee integrated the central high school in, a. but emmett, when his body was sent back to chicago, his mother, maimy till, wasn't an activist, she was forced into this. losing her only child. she said she wanted the casket open for the wake and the funeral. she wanted the world to see the ravages of racism. the brutality of big industry. thousands streamed by his casket and saw, and then jet magazine, another black publication, took photographed of the disextendded, mutilated head, and they were published and seared into the history and consciousness of this country. she had something very important to teach the press. show the pictures. show the images. cue imagine if for just one week we saw the images of war, every newspaper had a picture of a dead baby
to be an issue along the banks especially of the mississippi. for severe storms we're going to see them from southeastern montana to kansas, biggest threat large hail and damaging wind gust. temperature that's a big story. 74 degrees. that's it in chicago. nice and pleasant in the northeast. low humidity and highs around 80. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. honey... it's time to go. no. honey, it's too perfect. over a quarter million properties... you'll never want to leave. booking.com booking.yeah vietnam in 1972. [ all ] fort benning, georgia in 1999. [ male announcer ] usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commitment to serve military members, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. where over seventy-five percent of store management started as i'm the next american success story. working for a company hourly associates. there's opportunity here. i can use walmart's education be
of frank sinatra. ms. cel-- mississippi kelley's most recent book, "capturing camelot." very well photographed, obviously, and very well put together. personally, these picture books mean a lot more to me when the captions are well researched and thought out and a bit more prose than you would normally find which is what ms. kelley did with this book. never failing to raise a few eyebrows while uncovering stories and doing such a wonderfully painful job of reminding us our heroes are very, very human, please welcome to the festival kitty kelley. [applause] >> the only part of that introduction that isn't quite right is the prolific. it takes me four years -- >> i heard it from someone. >> no, you've got to be careful. [laughter] prolific as a turtle. it takes me four years usually on each book. but this one, this book was a labor of love because stanley tretick was one of my very best friends, and he was one of president kennedy's favorite photographers. and i used to go visit stanley in washington. and one time i asked him what he had in the marine corps locker that he used as hi
voting right cases for department.justice in 1963 in mississippi, john stepped between angry protesters and armed police to prevent a potential massacre after the murder of medgar evers. that was the kind of lawyer and later he was. years later, he gave me a photo with an inscription from tennyson's ulysses. to strive, to seek to a find, and not to yield. our nation's greatness is not a birthright. it must be earned by every generation. i am confident that we can earn it for this time. we are at our best one we live our values, including our devotion to democracy and protection under the rule of law when we widen that circle of opportunity and extend dignity to all of our citizens. i believe strongly that that is what is called for today. there is no group that i have more confidence in being able to rise and meet that challenge than the lawyers of america and particularly, the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> americans for tax reform president
many different ways can you make cod? >> ainsley: then mississippi, then alabama. >> tucker: have you been to high land foreign grill outside birmingham? >> brian: is this a push back on the study? >> tucker: this is a push back. >> ainsley: how about drunkest state? what do you think it is? louisiana, florida, california? where is nevada on there. >> tucker: what about maine? come on. >> ainsley: the rudest state. come on! who did they ask? new york? >> tucker: yeah. that's the foulest area. >> ainsley: shocker. new york, new jersey, then california. >> brian: if you get a chance to see people in california, they do seem rude. nicest state, georgia, minnesota or hawaii? all nice people and nice looking states. >> tucker: they're all nice. the cost of insurance is rising with obamacare a lot. what if there was a way around that? meet the doctor who saved one patient $17,000 by not using his insurance. >> ainsley: then the next batman is revealed. the name that no one expected. that's coming up. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy a
into a settlement agreement with the school district in meridian, mississippi, in which we found egregious examples of disproportionate suspension, expulsion, and school-based arrests. a black male high school student was told by one of his teachers that when he got older, he would either be in hell or in jail. andas suspended subsequently arrested for wearing the wrong socks to school. there was another black male high school student. an administrator asked him to tuck your shirt into his pants. he refused. the principal grabbed him in a headlock and he school security officer sprayed the student with mace. he was arrested and sent to juvenile detention. aree kinds of examples horrible. they have lifelong -- often lifelong consequences for students who are treated in this way. often times, they are unlawful. that is where the justice department can come in. we enforce the laws that bar discrimination by schools based on race, national origin, sex, and religion. that is what we did. we went into meridian, we investigated, we found that black students received harsher disciplinary consequences. susp
in the south like louisiana, mississippi. you know, what's happening in some of those states in terms of -- is that helping or hurting? >> that's a really important point. this is kind of one of the interesting demographic changes in america over the last 25 years. richard vedder is the expert on this who you'll hear from later. traditionally, immigrants have shunned the south other than texas. in fact, that's been a problem for growth in the south for a hundred, since the end of the civil war. now you're seeing dixie attracting the immigrant states like north carolina. one of the states that has had the biggest percentage increase in immigration over last 15 years has been georgia. and georgia actually has become a high growth state. and this gets to the point people ask are immigrants more attracted to a state that has high welfare went fits -- benefits or to a state that has jobs. and so we rooked at some of -- we looked at some of this evidence, and what we found was on balance immigrants are much more likely to go to states with low unemployment rates than they are to go to the s
can do how can we serve and then power them. in 1963 in jackson, mississippi, angry protesters and armed police prevented any massacre after the murder of edgar evans. that was a kind of lawyer and later that he was. years later he gave me his photo with a description from tennyson's eula says. .. and particularly the american bar association. thank you all very much. [applause] hillary clinton wrapping up her remarkings in san francisco. we are going to take you live with the national prez club and a discussion underway a minute ago on the role of government affairs officers and whether they help or hinder government transparency. live coverage on c-span2. >> the panelist presentations will be available on paoand reporters pao in public affairs officers and a and d reporters at blog spot. com. as a reporter i should disclose that i'm biased in favor of as much openness and disclosure as possible and as few rules as possible about who can talk to reporters in the federal government, and how. but i also recognize and i really mean this. the public affairs has an indispensable j
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